Six Reasons Why You Should Sign Up for that Next Competition!

  1. Have something to work towards. #GOALS

Having goals keeps you motivated, it gives you something to shoot for. You can focus your training (i.e this week I will work on pull-ups, and aim to link 3 by the end of the next week).  

  1. Discover your weaknesses.

It’s easy to say “I’m bad at double unders”, then just avoid them in a class. But with competitions, there’s nowhere to hide. Maybe DU’s or T2B is the only thing keeping you out of the Rx division. If so, this is a great way to dial in on those skills or lifts that you struggle at. Maybe signing up for that competition is the one thing that will finally motivate you to work on what is holding you back.  

  1. You don’t have to compete alone!

More often than not, many competitions will have a TEAM or PARTNER division.  This is a great way to get your favorite workout buddies together, come up with a silly name and have some fun.  Being part of a Scaled Team at an event can be a great way to get your feet wet if you are new to competing. And sometimes this is a great way for you to challenge yourself to step up to that Rx category if you have one of your teammates that might be able to do some of the higher skilled movements (i.e. muscle ups) while you push yourself on some of the heavier weights required.

  1. Gain inspiration and inspire others.

The camaraderie you get in your local box doesn’t leave when you get to a competition. Sure, everyone would like to win, but that doesn’t mean leaving others in the dirt. You will always see the top athletes stick around until the last person has finished, offering words of encouragement and advice. Be as inspired by the grit and determination of those left on the floor at the time-cap as you are by the flourish of the elite.

  1. Meet new people.

Whether it’s your fellow competitors, volunteers, judges or just watching, you’ve all got something highly emotive in common. This can create a bond you won’t get anywhere else. 

  1. Discover what your body can really do.

Maybe you can’t string T2B together during a WOD or have never run a sub-8 mile during your training. But you will be surprised what you can do come “Game Day”. The adrenaline and energy of the crowds and your fellow competitors can help give you that extra push. Competitions can be an awesome way to PR!  (And you can bet there will be someone there that got it on camera!)

  1. It’s FUN!!!

Ask the majority of CrossFitters that have ever competed and they DON’T do it to WIN, they DO it to FINISH, to COMPETE. And most, even if they said they would only do just one, do another and another! You may not always remember the struggle of training or the exhaustion that comes after the event, but you DO remember the awesome friends you made, the incredible athletic performances and the FUN you had.

If you are looking for more information on competing, what opportunities are out there or even how to focus your training, be sure to ask one of our amazing coaches or set up a personal training session.  If you are not a member, but are curious about CrossFit, whether you ever compete or not, be sure to check out our KICKSTART PROGRAMS including our Comprehensive Kickstart that includes a Movement Screen for Flexibility and Mobility.

 

AUTHOR’S NOTE: As always, I LOVE WHITEBOARD DAILY (@whiteboard_daily) for quick and easy visual explanations and some great drawings on perspective like the one in today’s blog.

 

Progress Plateaued? How is Your Strength Balance?

By Coach Amber Hopeman

Picture this: You have just completed a strength cycle for your back squat. You go to test your 1 Rep Max and… *Cue the sad trumpets*… No improvement. You have trained hard, you’ve eaten well, you’ve made sure to prioritize your recovery and nothing to show for it.

So what happened? Well there are a few factors to consider but for the purpose of this article I want to focus on one: Strength Balance. And let’s take that one step further by talking about unilateral strength, in this case, your left leg vs your right. Imbalances or discrepancies in strength (in addition to mobility and flexibility) can lead to pain and discomfort in the limb that is taking on more of the load but can also lead to poor performance and inevitably plateaus in progress.

“What we see in CrossFit programming is overzealous training of the squat pattern, with some form of squat being strengthened or conditioned on most days. In the novice or intermediate we will also see poor control in the bottom of the squat which increases the absolute load on the anterior knee and hip, and possibly the back. Holding tempo and developing strength in the bottom of the squat are important to develop in athletes who have painful squats.”

But whether your lack of progress is due to pain or not, most of the training we see is bilateral (front squat, back squat, strict press, strict pull-up). When was the last time you trained or beyond that even tested your unilateral strength (Front Rack Step Up, Single Arm Press, Single Arm High Pull)?

In the case of the above scenario a similar situation arose for an athlete. She was stuck at a 225# back squat despite significant training to improve. When she tested her Front Rack Step Up she was able to complete FOUR reps on her right leg with a 45# barbell. Her left leg… ZERO! No wonder a traditional back squat program was not helping. She had been basically squatting with one leg. With a quick shift in her training, she focused on her unilateral strength over the course of the next few weeks with front rack step-ups, bulgarian split squats and other unilateral movements always completing one extra set on her left leg. At the end of the program, she retested her back squat. 245# BOOM!

The takeaway: The strength was there, she always had the potential, she just had to access it.

In another awesome case, PR Star Fitness, a gym in Virginia all tested their athletes back squat numbers. Athletes were given the choice between back squats or step ups for the 6 week cycle. At the end of the 6 weeks, back squat numbers were tested again.
722 total lbs were added to back squat maxes in 6 weeks. Athletes who chose back squats added an average of 6.8 lbs to their squat (3.1% increase). Athletes who chose step ups added an average of 17.5 lbs to their squat (9.5% increase). They also tested Push Press, splitting the gym’s training between Push Press and Landmine Press. Focusing on just bilateral Push Press added an average of 1.4 lbs to an athletes Push Press (1.1% increase). Training the Landmine Press added an average of 13.2 lbs (an 11.1% increase).

So, whether you are struggling to get your first strict pullup, increase your back squat or bench press consider testing your unilateral strength. This just may be what is holding you back. How often does your gym train unilateral movements? Have you ever tested your strength ratios?

Check out the following article Gluteus Maximus Activation during Common Strength and Hypertrophy Exercises: A Systematic Review for more in depth research on how unilateral exercises have greater benefit than bilateral specific to the squat.

If you are looking for more in depth advice or training suggestions, be sure to ask one of our amazing coaches or set up a personal training session or series to test your own strength balance. If you are not a member, but are curious about CrossFit or learning any of these movements, be sure to check out our KICKSTART PROGRAMS including our Comprehensive Kickstart that includes a Movement Screen for Flexibility and Mobility.

AUTHOR’S NOTE: I LOVE WHITEBOARD DAILY (@whiteboard_daily) for quick and easy visual explanations. Another great account to follow on this topic is Active Life Rx (@activeliferx). If you aren’t already following them on IG or FB you should be!

 

Applying the Shapes: Part 3

So we have learned how to make the basic shapes and no matter how proficient you become in performing gymnastics movements, the fundamentals and foundational drills we discussed are always important to keep practicing!  So how do these shapes, the HOLLOW and ARCH, look when we are performing these movements?

I am going to start with one that may or may not be controversial, depending on how you have been taught.  Who has seen that person who REALLY wants to get their first pullup or muscle-up, they take about 5 to 10 paces away from the rig to get a huge running start and they jump to the bar immediately with chest forward into the arch position and then try to drive as hard as they can into hollow in order to get that first rep?  I know I have.  From what you have learned about the importance of the Arch, do you think they were able to achieve the rigid tension required to transition to the hollow and create the momentum they needed?

So I first offer this: when approaching the rig for your first rep, JUMP TO HOLLOW.  That’s right.  Stand under the bar, jump to the bar where you are already in the hollow position, then use everything you have learned to achieve that initial tension into the arch before attempting that first rep.

Secondly, when trying to become more efficient in stringing any of these movements together you should be focused on maintaining that hollow position at the top of the movement and when returning to below the bar.  For pullups and muscle ups this is crucial to stringing reps together and increasing your efficiency.  So when we are ready to begin our descent we are driving away from that bar in a hollow position so that we can quickly transition back to the arch and so forth. I would argue that the shoulders and lats must stay engaged but the focus should be keeping those legs tight and long.

For toes to bar, the hollow position is broken in order to get toes to the bar but the shoulder position and core engagement of the hollow remains the same.  The legs stay tight and long but the focus should be keeping those lats engaged so that the hips remain behind the plane of the rig and shoulders stay closed until you are ready to transition into the Arch as quickly as possible. No matter what the movement or variation of movement, the shapes all stay the same and maintaining those shapes at the right time in the movement will increase proficiency and efficiency.

I will close this out by saying that none of this is easy.  Especially for us adults.  Those that grew up with a gymnastics background may find this easy but learning these things as an adult can be extremely frustrating.  And drilling basics isn’t always fun.  And I know for most of us when we go to the gym, we just want a good workout and have fun.

But most of us also want to see progress.  We want to get better.  And this takes time.  You may not go home and start incorporating these drills into your everyday routine and that is fine.  But next time you start getting frustrated with yourself for not being able to string your toes to bar together or you start feeling like you aren’t making any progress in getting that first chest to bar or muscle up even though you know you have the strength, consider what you are actually doing to help you achieve this next step.  It might just take a little more focus on the fundamentals.

Next time you have a few minutes before class or after, try some of these out!  If you are looking for more in depth advice or training progressions, be sure to ask one of our amazing coaches or set up a personal training session.  If you are not a member, but are curious about CrossFit or learning any of these movements, be sure to check out our KICKSTART PROGRAMS.

 

AUTHOR’S NOTE: As you might have noticed I LOVE WHITEBOARD DAILY (@whiteboard_daily) for quick and easy visual explanations.  If you aren’t already following them on IG or FB you should be.  Some other great gymnastics accounts related to CrossFit to follow are: @thegymnasticscourse @pamelagnon @performanceplusprogram @thebarbellphysio @functional.gymnastics

 

Photo credit:

Diagrams: @whiteboard_daily

 

Mental Toughness: Preparing for MURPH

By Coach Amber Hopeman

It’s been a year since we reopened our doors following quarantine.  Many of us are still working from home, homeschooling our children, and adjusting to reestablishing that human contact we so craved.  Even if we didn’t crave it, many of us realize just how much we miss it after it is taken away.  We have all had to make certain consolations, compromises, and sacrifices over the past year.  We were just trying to survive, not thrive during this time.  

Last year I wrote this blog post on how to go about mentally and physically preparing for Murph coming off of quarantine.  This year, we have a ton of new members and even though many of us have been back at this whole CrossFit thing for a bit now, it is still important to take note just how ready we are to execute probably the most popular and recognizable CrossFit HERO Workout there is: MURPH.

The basis behind any HERO workout, in my opinion is to honor those that it is named for, reaching deep within yourself to find that inner strength, remembering their sacrifice and pushing yourself most likely beyond where you think you can go both physically and mentally.  They are long workouts and meant to be grueling, but man, can they be fun!  MURPH is one of those I always look forward to.

For a lot of us, we have spent the last year doing exactly this: searching for that inner strength, achieving things in manners we didn’t think possible, surviving each day. We have come out of quarantine finding ourselves still isolated from those we work with, having to find connections in new ways and finding new ways to stay motivated.  Despite the world returning to a new normal, we are exhausted.  We HAVE sacrificed.  As a Navy veteran and former Army Wife, I will also tell you that just because your sacrifices were not made on the battlefield, does not make them any less valid or real.

So this Memorial Day, if you are in town and are able to complete MURPH, consider these sacrifices. Consider: your workload, how much you have been actually working out, have you been prepping for this workout, how much of that 20lb weight vest you normally wear are you carrying around daily now because of your diet, ARE YOU REALLY READY?  The thing about MURPH is it’s high volume.  What is your strict strength like right now?  When is the last time you attempted a high volume pullup workout?  When is the last time you ran a mile?  Attempting 100 pullups for the first time in over a month (even a week) can put some serious strain on your body.  The risk of injury is extremely high. 

Unless you are a competitive athlete (in which preparedness for this WOD should not be an issue), your goal at the gym is most likely to maintain a certain level of fitness and probably look good naked.  In order to maintain that level or even improve, your biggest goal should be to remain PAIN FREE!  So when thinking about how you are going to go about MURPH this year consider one last thing: sometimes the greatest example of mental toughness is doing what is right, and in this instance that is SCALING!  It’s easy to go HAM all the time, but is it the right thing to do?  I recognize that making the decision to scale MURPH after the year that we have been through may not be what you want to hear, but it is what you NEED to hear.

So go to the gym, do ring rows or bent over DB rows for the pullups, drop to your knees for the push-ups or with hands on a box, squat to a box or ball if your range of motion is not what it used to be.  Bike instead of run.  Grab your SwoleMate and make it a PartnerWOD.  As coaches, we want you to always understand the intent of the movement and workout so you know what level of intensity you are trying to achieve.

For those of you who are ready to tackle Murph head on: If you have never done MURPH unpartitioned, consider doing so before throwing on a weight vest and splitting up the reps.  Or wear the weight vest for the run but take it off inside the gym.  Adding weight at this high of volume without preparation will only lead to unnecessary injury.

So don’t forget the intent of MURPH, the intent of MEMORIAL DAY: to come together as a community and honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.  The minute you have walked in that door to the gym you have done that.  Clicking the Rx button doesn’t change that.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THIS MEMORIAL DAY!  HEATS WILL BE AT 9:30 AND 10:30am!  SIGN UP VIA WODIFY TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT!

WAYS TO PARTITION MURPH

WAYS TO SCALE MURPH

 

Who is LT Michael P. Murphy?

Michael P. Murphy, United States Navy (SEAL)

May 7, 1976 – June 28, 2005

Michael P. Murphy (SEAL) was the officer-in-charge of a four-man SEAL element in support of Operation Red Wings, tasked with finding a key anti-coalition militia commander near Asadabad, Afghanistan. Shortly after inserting into the objective area, the SEALs were spotted by three goat herders who were initially detained and then released. It is believed the goat herders immediately reported the SEALs’ presence to Taliban fighters.

A fierce gun battle ensued on the steep face of the mountain between the SEALs and a much larger enemy force. Despite the intensity of the firefight and suffering grave gunshot wounds himself, Murphy is credited with risking his own life to save the lives of his teammates. Murphy, intent on making contact with headquarters, but realizing this would be impossible in the extreme terrain where they were fighting, unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own life moved into the open, where he could gain a better position to transmit a call to get help for his men.

Moving away from the protective mountain rocks, he knowingly exposed himself to increased enemy gunfire. This deliberate and heroic act deprived him of cover and made him a target for the enemy. While continuing to be fired upon, Murphy made contact with the SOF Quick Reaction Force at Bagram Air Base and requested assistance. He calmly provided his unit’s location and the size of the enemy force while requesting immediate support for his team. At one point, he was shot in the back causing him to drop the transmitter. Murphy picked it back up, completed the call and continued firing at the enemy who was closing in. Severely wounded, LT. Murphy returned to his cover position with his men and continued the battle.

Murphy fought on, allowing one member of his team (Marcus Luttrell) to escape, before he was killed. For his selfless actions, LT. Michael Murphy was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor on October 27, 2007. We honor his sacrifice and memory through The Murph Challenge. Find out more about Michael Murphy at the Memorial Foundation created in his name.

The Hollow: Part 2

The Hollow position is probably the more well known position and the one that is focused on the most when developing core strength and well it’s the position that actually creates and gets you above that bar.  But we want efficiency.  And that means maintaining the tension as we transition from the Arch to the Hollow.  Again, arms and legs are fully extended and knees and ankles are squeezed tight with toes pointed.  Ideally in this position on the ground,  one could push down on your toes and your top half would lift, moving as one shape, not breaking at any point.

Many athletes lose this shape by swinging the legs upward into a piked position, losing lat engagement when the shoulder angle closes or trying to thrust the hips toward the bar thus creating an arch again rather than maintaining the hollow position.

Again, practicing on the ground is a great first step.  Whiteboard Daily has a great diagram of progressions (see above) that you can use to build up your strength and stamina in these positions.  The key is to keep the core tight by keeping back into the floor.  Once you have progressed to the full hollow hold position, hollow rocks are a great way to practice maintaining that tension.  Want to take it up another notch? Grab a PVC pipe to simulate holding onto the rig and practice POPPING into that position as quickly as possible. 

In PART THREE, I will be discussing putting the two of these together and how they should be achieved when actually performing specific gymnastics movements such as the pullup, toes to bar and the muscle up.  In the meantime, here is an exercise you can do to build up your stamina in these positions as well as drilling a FAST and EFFICIENT transition between the two.  It’s called the LOG ROLL, and I first discovered it on BreakingMuscle.com:

This exercise is almost exactly what it sounds like. The difference is that while you’re rolling from your stomach to your back, you will be alternating between the arch and hollow, respectively. Start by finding your hollow position. Then roll left or right, transitioning into your arch position. Once in the arch position roll back left or right transitioning back into your hollow position. The goal is to be able to snap from one position to the other.

Minimize excess movement outside of the hollow and arch as much as possible. Your legs should remain glued together and you should continuously squeeze your glutes, abs, and quads throughout the movement.

Want another challenging option? Check out the Hollow Arch Pulls at the bottom of the same article by clicking HERE!

Next time you have a few minutes before class or after, try some of these out!  If you are looking for more in depth advice or training progressions, be sure to ask one of our amazing coaches or set up a personal training session.  If you are not a member, but are curious about CrossFit or learning any of these movements, be sure to check out our KICKSTART PROGRAMS.

 

AUTHOR’S NOTE: As you might have noticed I LOVE WHITEBOARD DAILY (@whiteboard_daily) for quick and easy visual explanations.  If you aren’t already following them on IG or FB you should be.  Some other great gymnastics accounts related to CrossFit to follow are: @thegymnasticscourse @pamelagnon @performanceplusprogram @thebarbellphysio @functional.gymnastics

Photo credits:

Diagram: @whiteboard_daily

Photo: @crossfitdunwoody

Gymnastics is All about Shapes: The Arch (Part One)

By: Coach Amber Hopeman (@eat.train.mom)

Beyond strict strength, when it comes to Gymnastics it is all about making SHAPES!

@whiteboard_daily

The two major shapes we are concerned with when doing gymnastic movements in CrossFit are the Hollow and Arch positions.  In order to kip we are simply moving from hollow to arch and back as efficiently as possible.  And to be efficient we aren’t just swinging from the bar but we are actively pulling ourselves into these positions. 

So let’s break each one down starting with the Arch.  Why start with the Arch?  Because it’s the one most overlooked and when that happens a lot of power is left on the table and if not drilled at the fundamental level can prevent you from progression to higher skilled movements like the Muscle-Up.  The power comes from creating as much tension as possible in the arch to use in the transition to the hollow that will create the upward momentum we need to accomplish these movements.

By keeping the body LONG and RIGID, we create this tension.  Whether on your stomach or hanging from the bar, the position is the same: arms and legs are STRAIGHT, heels squeezed together, stomach is tight and butt is squeezed.  Lie face down on your stomach and try this. Stretch your arms above your head, keep your chin tucked.  Firstly, reach your fingertips as far forward 0as possible and just squeeze those knees and heels together.  You should feel that rigidness. 

Now just squeeze your butt.  If you have stayed long, even with this just small activation of the glutes, your feet should raise off the ground.  Now, while keeping your chin tucked, lift your chest off the ground like there is a string at the base of your neck pulling you upwards as you reach your fingers forward as far as possible.  Lift the legs slightly higher so that knees are off the ground, legs stay straight, toes are pointed. This is the Arch position.  Notice you aren’t hyperextending your back nor are you making a “C” with your body.  Try doing this a few times and then jump to the rig and attempt the same thing.  Engage your lats by drawing your shoulders away from your ears, keep the body long and repeat the same thing you did on the floor.  Notice how your body shifts without swinging, this is the tension we are trying to create.

So it’s great if you are actively engaging in kipping movements again coming off of quarantine. But remember, no one gets better at pull-ups by just doing more pull-ups, you get better by perfecting the basics, drilling the fundamentals that will translate to the power you need when executing the full movement.

Next time you have a few minutes before class or after, try some of these out!  If you are looking for more in depth advice or training progressions, be sure to ask one of our amazing coaches or set up a personal training session.  If you are not a member, but are curious about CrossFit or learning any of these movements, be sure to check out our KICKSTART PROGRAMS.

 

AUTHOR’S NOTE: As you might have noticed I LOVE WHITEBOARD DAILY (@whiteboard_daily) for quick and easy visual explanations.  If you aren’t already following them on IG or FB you should be.  Some other great gymnastics accounts related to CrossFit to follow are: @thegymnasticscourse @pamelagnon @performanceplusprogram @thebarbellphysio @functional.gymnastics 

 

Photo Credits:

Diagram- @whiteboard_daily

Arch Photo- @crossfitdunwoody

The 1st Annual DunWODy Showcase

CrossFit Dunwoody was thrilled to hold the first annual DunWODy Showcase this past Saturday! Thank you to all the participants, judges, sponsors, and spectators who came out to make the competition an extremely fun and rewarding event.

Click below to watch a few highlights from the competition!

The competition had teams of two competing in four divisions: Rx-Female, Rx-Male, Scaled-Female, and Scaled-Male.

The three events were:

Event 1: “Jiffy”

  • AMRAP 13
    • Rx: 20 Calorie Row, 20 Box Jumps (24/20), 20 Wall Balls (20/14) (10’/9’)
    • Scaled: 20 Calorie Row, 20 Box Step-ups (24/20), 20 Wall Balls (14/10) (10’/9’)
    • Score: Rounds and Reps
    • Notes: 1 Partner Works at time.

Event 2: “Oil and Water”

  • 1 Rep Max Clean; 12 Minute Time Cap
    • Score: Combined weight of each partner’s heaviest Clean.
    • Rx: Partners must complete 100 Burpees (combined) during 12 Minute window in order for lifts to count.
    • Scaled: Partners must complete 75 Burpees (combined) during 12 Minute window in order for lifts to count.
    • Notes: Only 1 Partner works at a time.  When a Partner is performing a clean, burpees must stop.  Partner can add/remove weight while other partner is doing burpees.

Event 3: “Breakdown”

  • For Time; 10 Minute Time Cap
    • Rx: 42-30-18; Thrusters (115/75) and Pull-ups
    • Scaled: 42-30-18; Thrusters (85/55) and Ring Rows
    • Score: Time to finish or completed reps
    • Notes: 1 Partner Works at a time.
    • Ring Rows: All rings will be set to the same height and a line will be drawn on the ground that feet must be past.

Congratulations to all our amazing competitors!

Huge shout-out to our awesome sponsors: Big Frog, Marlow’s Tavern, Moondogs, Kanon Architects, Sleep Better Georgia, Hawkins Spizman Fortas, Painting with a Twist, and Lavista Associates.

Interested in joining our awesome community? Click here to get started!

City of Dunwoody Celebrated CFD’s Grand Opening with Ribbon Cutting

The City of Dunwoody hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony at CrossFit Dunwoody’s new location on Wednesday, September 23rd at 11:30AM. The ceremony was held at 1343 Dunwoody Village Pkwy, Dunwoody, GA 30338, where CFD has renovated the old Jiffy Lube into a brand new facility with several unique features.

“We are so excited, myself along with members of Dunwoody City Council and City Manager to welcome you to your new home,” said Dunwoody Mayor Lynn Deustch. “You have made a very attractive and inviting permanent facility for CFD and we wish you tremendous success. Dunwoody residents, if you haven’t seen it please drop by!”

 

“We just opened up our new facility on August 31st. We’re so excited to lay a foundation here in the City of Dunwoody,” said Glenn Dorris, owner of CrossFit Dunwoody.

Glenn took the City of Dunwoody on a virtual tour of the gym. “We kept it very open, left the bay doors, and we’ve got our rig here for lifting weights and pullups. Our prized feature is our outdoor workout space. We added to the back of the building, it’s completely outdoors. One of the coolest things about the new facility is we’ve got a kid’s room. People are welcome to bring their kids.”

Click here to watch the ribbon cutting ceremony and to see CFD’s gorgeous new space.

Interested in stopping by to see the gym in person? Click here to schedule your free intro session.

Q&A with Bella Zack: High Schooler, CrossFitter, Our Champion

Last weekend CrossFit Dunwoody had one of our own compete in the Garage Games Junior Open in Woodstock, GA. Bella Zack is only 16 years old. She carries with her a water bottle with a sticker that says “Eat. Sleep. CrossFit.” And that pretty much sums her up.  Not only did she participate in last week’s competition, but she placed 1st in her age group to take the top spot on the podium. 

In addition to going to school and working out at CrossFit Dunwoody, she also works part time deep cleaning the gym every day to keep it clean and our athletes safe and healthy.  Her work ethic shines in and out of the gym and we had to know just what motivates this young athlete to grab Crossfit by the horns and dominate the way she does.

So we sat down with her this week and asked her a few questions about what got her interested in CrossFit and why she started competing:

CFD: Tell us about yourself!

Bella: My name is Bella Zack and I am 16 years old. I am a junior in high school at Saint Francis. Some of my hobbies are CrossFit, and I am also involved in Drama at school. When I am not at school or hanging out with my friends, I am at the gym. 

CFD: How did you get into CrossFit? How long have you been at CrossFit Dunwoody?

Bella: In the 7th grade I ran cross country and I liked the way I felt after I finished a race. After the season ended, I needed to find another way to exercise. I started taking CrossFit kids classes at another gym. It was a long commute to get to the gym every night so ended up not going as much as I would have liked. Luckily CrossFit Dunwoody opened up so close to my house! I started working out at CrossFit Dunwoody in October 2017.

CFD: What do you like best about CrossFit/competitions?

Bella: The thing I love the most about CrossFit is that it is different every single day. I also love that there is something that you can improve on every time you come into the gym. The thing I love about competitions is the excitement of showing off what you are capable of and pushing your limits.  

CFD: What made you decide to begin competing?

Bella: I have always wanted to compete but was too scared. I competed in my first competition in December of 2019.  I knew after that I wanted to compete more often and become more serious.

CFD: What advice would you give someone thinking about joining CrossFit?

Bella: If you are thinking about joining CrossFit, you should not be intimidated at all. You can scale any of the movements and the coaches are great at giving modifications. Also, you will feel so much better after you workout. 

CFD: What has competing taught you? Has it changed you in any way?

Bella: Competing has helped me get out of my comfort zone and has taught me to push to the limit. Competing has shown me that I am better than I thought!

CFD: How would you describe your daily or weekly workout routine? Nutrition? Sleep habits? 

Bella: I try to workout five to six times a week. Before I go to workout I try to have a protein bar to give me some energy. I try to get at least eight hours of sleep each night but sometimes that does not happen because of school/TikTok/Netflix, etc..

CFD: What advice would you give to someone thinking about competing? 

Bella: If you are thinking about competing you should sign up for one, even if you are in a scaled division. It is super rewarding once you have finished all the workouts. 

CFD: What is your favorite WOD? Favorite movement? 

Bella: My favorite workout is Annie. Annie is a benchmark workout that is 50, 40, 30, 20, and 10 reps of double unders and sit ups. My favorite movement is the deadlift because I feel super strong when I can pick up so much weight.  

CFD: How has COVID changed your workout routine?

Bella: I worked out and did all of the home workouts during quarantine. I was limited on which equipment I had so I definitely repeated a lot of the same movements. When everything was shut down I was in the middle of trying to build up skills to be able to qualify for a competition down in Miami, Florida. It was definitely hard to adjust to the way I was working out and not being able to go to the gym everyday. 

CFD: Why should people join CrossFit Dunwoody? 

Bella: People should join CrossFit Dunwoody because of the amazing community. I am one of the youngest people who workout there and everyone is so welcoming and encouraging. It is truly my happy place. 

 

Everyone at CrossFit Dunwoody is so proud of her for pushing out of her comfort zone and starting to compete.  She is the future of fitness and we can’t wait to watch what she does next.  Especially on TikTok!!

If you are looking for more information on competing, what opportunities are out there or even how to focus your training, be sure to ask one of our amazing coaches or set up a personal training session.  If you are not a member, but are curious about CrossFit, whether you ever compete or not, be sure to check out our KICKSTART PROGRAMS including our Comprehensive Kickstart that includes a Movement Screen for Flexibility and Mobility.